LAST REAL INDIANS

Police officers who shot Indian teen get medals by Brandon Ecoffey

CLINTON, Okla. — Two recipients of the Oklahoma Sheriff’s Association Medal of Honor were also involved in the shooting death of Mah-hi-Vist GoodBlanket. The parents of GoodBlanket feel that both the shooting of their son and the awards given are unjustified.

In December of 2013, the GoodBlankets had called the police to their home after their son Mah-hi-Vist (18) had raised alarm after slipping in to what they have called an Oppositional Defiant Disorder episode.

“We called the police to protect him,” said his mother Melissa. “By the time the police had arrived he had calmed down and was in there with his girlfriend.”

The GoodBlankets were waiting in their car when police deputies first arrived at their home. According to them, two officers entered the home through a broken window and then within seconds exited through the same window. The GoodBlankets say that there was then a second entry that ended with the shooting of Mah-hi-Vist seconds after officers breached the house.

The officers have claimed that Mah-hi-Vist had threatened officers with a knife and that they were forced to shoot him.

The GoodBlankets say that the claims of officers do not reflect what they saw happen from their vantage point in the driveway where they say they could see in to the windows of the home. Custer County Sheriffs had been accompanied by two Oklahoma Highway Patrolmen in the final moments of Mah-hi-Vist’s as he was in the home with his girlfriend. Autopsy reports show that Mah-hi-Vist was shot 7 times, once in the head, and twice by a Taser gun.

“His girlfriend came running out on the yard screaming that they had shot him,” said Melissa GoodBlanket, the mother of Mah-hi-Vist.

Melissa says that the shooting was an example of excessive force and feels that the shooting was unnecessary.

READ THE REST HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/police-officers-who-shot-indian-teen-get-medals-by-brandon-ecoffey/

Native rap star Frank Waln to perform for ESPN show on R-word*

CHICAGO – If you haven’t heard the uproar over the Washington R******s and the push to #changethename, then you haven’t been paying attention to social media or you’ve been living under a rock. Recently, ex-Bears head coach Mike Ditka said, “R****** name change is so stupid, it’s appalling.” While on the flip side, NFL sportscasters Phil Simms and Tony Dungy have said they will only refer to the Washington team as Washington and not the R-word.

ESPN came to the American Indian Center of Chicago, to film (Indian-famous soon to be real-famous) rap star Frank Waln performing a new song for the show, “Outside the Lines.” The shoot was done on the stage at Chicago’s American Indian Center with Robert Wapahi’s mural beautifully lit up in the background. This was a closed shoot and, according to the director, the show is to be focused on the Washington R-word and the debate over a name change. After filming the video, Chi-Nations had the chance to catch up with Frank to talk about how the issue is affecting the youth and he had a lot to say. (See video below.)

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/native-rap-star-frank-waln-to-perform-for-espn-show-on-r-word/

Native rap star Frank Waln to perform for ESPN show on R-word*

CHICAGO – If you haven’t heard the uproar over the Washington R******s and the push to #changethename, then you haven’t been paying attention to social media or you’ve been living under a rock. Recently, ex-Bears head coach Mike Ditka said, “R****** name change is so stupid, it’s appalling.” While on the flip side, NFL sportscasters Phil Simms and Tony Dungy have said they will only refer to the Washington team as Washington and not the R-word.

ESPN came to the American Indian Center of Chicago, to film (Indian-famous soon to be real-famous) rap star Frank Waln performing a new song for the show, “Outside the Lines.” The shoot was done on the stage at Chicago’s American Indian Center with Robert Wapahi’s mural beautifully lit up in the background. This was a closed shoot and, according to the director, the show is to be focused on the Washington R-word and the debate over a name change. After filming the video, Chi-Nations had the chance to catch up with Frank to talk about how the issue is affecting the youth and he had a lot to say. (See video below.)

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/native-rap-star-frank-waln-to-perform-for-espn-show-on-r-word/

For Immediate Release: Honor the Earth 8/28 Bemidji Press Conference ‏at Enbridge Energy

3:00 PM Press Conference Thursday, August 28th
@ Enbridge Energy Bemidji Area Office
1129 Industrial Park Dr SE, Bemidji, MN

BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA – Wednesday, August 27th, Winona LaDuke, Executive Director of Honor the Earth, successfully completes 200 mile horse ride against the proposed Enbridge Sandpiper fracking oil pipeline. Partnering with the leadership for the campaign is Shane Davis, Executive Director Fractivist.org, an oil and gas analyst from Colorado.

LaDuke and her team will be holding a press conference this Thursday, August 28th, at 3PM CST at the Enbridge headquarters, 1129 Industrial Park Drive SE, Bemidji, MN 56601.

The epic horseback journey traversed Sandy Lake and Rice Lake watersheds, the mother lode for wild rice in Minnesota. The proposed pipeline would divide the traditional wild rice beds from East to West.
Michael Dahl, Anishinaabe spiritual leader and rider explained, “This is the same path our ancestors walked. Now we are riding in those same footsteps. We are here to protect this land for future generations.”

LaDuke says “Enbridge chose a bad path. The people of Minnesota love their water more than oil and they are standing up against the pipeline. A single leak in the pipeline could discharge 20,000 gallons of fracking oil per minute. This could lead to an environmental catastrophe.”

Honor the Earth is gathering at the Bemidji headquarters of Enbridge to say no to any pipelines going through their lands. LaDuke will be onsite for questions and answers and invites all landowners that would be affected by the fracking oil pipeline, grassroots organizations, general public and all media outlets to attend.

This event is to inform the communities, and affected landowners, about the organization’s recent and upcoming activity for the STOP the Sandpiper campaign. All communities, grassroots organizations, affected landowners, and Enbridge are invited to attend.

Contact:
Alyssa Hoppe
(612) 385 – 1557

Navajo golfer Rickie Fowler is a fast-rising star By Brandon Ecoffey
There are a ton of Natives out there who play the game of golf but if you are not an avid sports fan you may have missed that two of the faces of modern golf are Native American. Notah Begay, who is a former PGA tour pro, is now an analyst for the Golf Channel, and Rickie Fowler, one of the fastest rising stars in all of sports and a fixture on the final round of nearly every major tournament are both Navajo. Although some may argue that the PGA should do more to market the fact that they are Native American I can appreciate the fact that promoters of the game are allowing their talent and accomplishments to speak for themselves.
READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/08/25/navajo-golfer-rickie-fowler-is-a-fast-rising-star-by-brandon-ecoffey/

Navajo golfer Rickie Fowler is a fast-rising star By Brandon Ecoffey

There are a ton of Natives out there who play the game of golf but if you are not an avid sports fan you may have missed that two of the faces of modern golf are Native American. Notah Begay, who is a former PGA tour pro, is now an analyst for the Golf Channel, and Rickie Fowler, one of the fastest rising stars in all of sports and a fixture on the final round of nearly every major tournament are both Navajo. Although some may argue that the PGA should do more to market the fact that they are Native American I can appreciate the fact that promoters of the game are allowing their talent and accomplishments to speak for themselves.

READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/08/25/navajo-golfer-rickie-fowler-is-a-fast-rising-star-by-brandon-ecoffey/

Three Police Guns and a Baby, By Cindy Gomez-Schempp

On July 25, 2014, 13 Fargo, ND police officers were dispatched to arrest one 15 year old girl. She claimed Fargo police used excessive force. Officers said they smelled marijuana. She reportedly told officers she was retrieving her sister’s phone and charger from the car but was still dragged her from the car, had her head beat on the hood of a car, and was handcuffed and hogtied causing excruciating pain to her arms, wrists and ankles. (See original story here)

A week and a half later, the 15 year old’s mom went to the police department with her lawyer to request a complaint form from the Fargo Police concerning the brutal arrest of her innocent 15 year old daughter. The day after she met with the Fargo Police Department’s Office of Professional Standards, her car was pulled over by an unmarked police vehicle. She was ready to record because she had been reporting repeated harassment from police toward her family members, especially those who witnessed and reported on her daughter’s arrest.

3 Police Guns and a Baby While giving her friend a ride, she was boxed in and detained by a hoard of police cars during a traffic stop on the vehicle ahead of her (which her passenger’s daughter and boyfriend were traveling in). During the stop officers drew their guns at unarmed occupants including a three year old toddler. A recent Nation article cited what every U.S. Marine knows: That you never point a weapon at anything you do not intend to shoot. Neither the Ferguson nor the Fargo police have been advised of this important distinction.

The disturbing encounter for this embattled Fargo mother, included three guns pulled on the scene against unarmed travelers; one of them a three year old child. The person they arrested did not resist arrest, made his hands visible, and did not pose any visible threat to officers. The mother of the 15 year old recently reporting excessive force claims that she is now being subjected to constant surveillance and harassment as a result of exposing police misconduct to media. The unmarked police vehicle that detained both cars had been sitting outside her home “all day”, and she suspected it as a surveillance vehicle once she left the mobile home park where she lives and noticed it was following her.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/three-police-guns-and-a-baby-by-cindy-gomez-schempp/

THE PEOPLE - a Short Film by Indigenous Filmmakers | Indiegogo

In an effort to build representation for Native American/American Indian creatives and filmmakers, we begin our journey by bringing life to our first short film, produced by our independent production company: INDIGENE ENTERTAINMENT STUDIOS.

in·di·gene (/’indiˌjēn/) noun
“an indigenous person.”

INDIGENE ENTERTAINMENT STUDIOS (or “Indigene Studios”, or just “Indigene”) is an independent creative house production company that we founded on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Our mission is to tell our own stories, rich in our culture and heritage, and to produce and share them with the world. We want to bring our Native voices into the digital era through film, photography, and theatre. As young creative artists, we strive towards being innovative and forward thinking in how we produce our projects and distribute them to the world. We move toward telling unique stories that blend universal themes with our own distinct narratives as indigenous people.

We continue to strive toward changing the negative representations of indigenous peoples (starting with our own people, the Lakota oyate) through a diverse and personal look at contemporary Native people, using engaging and enlightening non-fiction and fictional creative projects. By taking great care, we hope to foster a positive conversation about Native ideals and issues with our audiences.

Our communities on the reservation are an important part of Indigene’s development. We want to get them involved in all projects we produce. Community involvement provides us the opportunity to develop programming that will give educational training and on-set experience. This programming can be used by the young, aspiring artists within the community to aid them in their creative careers. Indigene’s goal is to create a collaborative and thriving local community of creative Native American artists, who are pursuing professions in the industry of film, media and entertainment, with hopes to diversify the industry.

Two more South Dakota Lakota tribes advance toward their own foster care systems, intending to replace the State DSS system

The Lakota people have taken another positive step toward preserving their cultural sovereignty and solving the persistent foster care crisis in the state as two more tribes have joined the movement to apply for available federal funding to plan their own tribal-run foster care system.

“The addition of Flandreau and Lower Brule Sioux Tribes to the growing list of South Dakota-based Lakota tribes applying for federal funding demonstrates that the goal of establishing independent foster care systems is within reach,” said Chase Iron Eyes, attorney for the Lakota People’s Law Project and a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. “The Lakota tribal governments have done their part, it is time for the United States government to meet its obligation to Indian Country. No more broken promises, no more unfulfilled agreements.”

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/two-more-south-dakota-lakota-tribes-advance-toward-their-own-foster-care-systems-intending-to-replace-the-state-dss-system/

Two more South Dakota Lakota tribes advance toward their own foster care systems, intending to replace the State DSS system

The Lakota people have taken another positive step toward preserving their cultural sovereignty and solving the persistent foster care crisis in the state as two more tribes have joined the movement to apply for available federal funding to plan their own tribal-run foster care system.

“The addition of Flandreau and Lower Brule Sioux Tribes to the growing list of South Dakota-based Lakota tribes applying for federal funding demonstrates that the goal of establishing independent foster care systems is within reach,” said Chase Iron Eyes, attorney for the Lakota People’s Law Project and a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. “The Lakota tribal governments have done their part, it is time for the United States government to meet its obligation to Indian Country. No more broken promises, no more unfulfilled agreements.”

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/two-more-south-dakota-lakota-tribes-advance-toward-their-own-foster-care-systems-intending-to-replace-the-state-dss-system/

Leaving the Rez and Living the Rez -By Denny Gayton

Some call it the brain drain, some people call it escape, some people call it success. Whatever you want to call leaving the rez, there is always at least one other side to it.
 Some Indians go to college and never come home. Some Indians grow up and will do anything to get away. Some of them do it, too. Some people leave and become a success; get a great job, or something else. There are a lot of other ways people leave the rez. No one but you is going to make the rez a better place than the place you grew up in.

​Our children, we, live unorganized lives. There are people at home on the rez who aren’t eating or eating enough tonight, and there is only one person you can count on to change that. There is abuse at home on the rez, and there is only one person you can count on to change that. There are people at home on the rez who have zero trust for the people working at the hospitals they go to, and there is only one person you can count on to change that. There are houses falling apart on the rez, and there is only one person you can count on to change that. There are companies & corporations, not to mention governments, in planning meetings detailing how to steal what they call your resources away from your people, and there is only one person you can count on to change that.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/leaving-the-rez-and-living-the-rez-by-denny-dayton/

Leaving the Rez and Living the Rez -By Denny Gayton

Some call it the brain drain, some people call it escape, some people call it success. Whatever you want to call leaving the rez, there is always at least one other side to it.
Some Indians go to college and never come home. Some Indians grow up and will do anything to get away. Some of them do it, too. Some people leave and become a success; get a great job, or something else. There are a lot of other ways people leave the rez. No one but you is going to make the rez a better place than the place you grew up in.

​Our children, we, live unorganized lives. There are people at home on the rez who aren’t eating or eating enough tonight, and there is only one person you can count on to change that. There is abuse at home on the rez, and there is only one person you can count on to change that. There are people at home on the rez who have zero trust for the people working at the hospitals they go to, and there is only one person you can count on to change that. There are houses falling apart on the rez, and there is only one person you can count on to change that. There are companies & corporations, not to mention governments, in planning meetings detailing how to steal what they call your resources away from your people, and there is only one person you can count on to change that.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/leaving-the-rez-and-living-the-rez-by-denny-dayton/

Reach Out and Come Together – by Evon Peter

"Suicide is a reflection of social suffering. The pressures and complexity of life Indigenous people face on a day-to-day basis are astounding. We often navigate personal trauma, communal dysfunction, unresolved grief, family losses, and addictive behaviors, while having to also deal with oppressive and assimilative parts of imposed systems (governance / education) and behaviors (racism / indifference) from a dominant culture."

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/reach-out-and-come-together-by-evon-peter-2/