LAST REAL INDIANS

The Fat Takers Pipeline: Native People, the KXL, the Cowboy and Indian Alliance and the Constitution by Winona LaDuke

“No Keystone XL Black Snake Pipeline will cross Lakota Lands. We will protect our lands and waters and we have our horses ready…” Brian Brewer , President of the Oglala Sioux Tribe

In mid February, the Keystone XL Pipeline, or the Black Snake found some stronger adversaries. “It poses a threat to our sacred water and the product is coming from the tar sands and our tribes oppose the tar sands mining,” Debra White Plume, an Oglala leader told the press. White Plume’s family and many others have opposed the pipeline, along with a myriad of uranium mining projects proposed for the Paha Sapa, the Black Hills. “All of our tribes have taken action to oppose the Keystone XL pipeline. Members from the seven tribes of the Lakota Nation, along with tribal members and tribes in Idaho, Oklahoma, Montana, Nebraska and Oregon, are prepared to stop construction of the pipeline. “

This past October, the Lakota rode some of the proposed pipeline route in a set of 3 rides organized by grassroots and national organizations, including Honor the Earth, Owe Aku, and 350.org. The routes covered territory between Wanbli on the Pine Ridge reservation to Takini on the Cheyenne River reservation, in a spiritual ride to honor the water and counter the oil. This ride was one of three rides (the other 2 were Minnesota pipeline rides on the Alberta Clipper and proposed Sandpiper route for fracked oil). The Lakota will ride again. That is, if the pipeline project gets President Obama’s approval. That is, if the Nebraska and Iowa lawmakers don’t stop it first because of the little constitutional problems of eminent domain. That is also, if the Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t close it down.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/the-fat-takers-pipeline-native-people-the-kxl-the-cowboy-and-indian-alliance-and-the-constitution-by-winona-laduke/

The Fat Takers Pipeline: Native People, the KXL, the Cowboy and Indian Alliance and the Constitution by Winona LaDuke

“No Keystone XL Black Snake Pipeline will cross Lakota Lands. We will protect our lands and waters and we have our horses ready…” Brian Brewer , President of the Oglala Sioux Tribe

In mid February, the Keystone XL Pipeline, or the Black Snake found some stronger adversaries. “It poses a threat to our sacred water and the product is coming from the tar sands and our tribes oppose the tar sands mining,” Debra White Plume, an Oglala leader told the press. White Plume’s family and many others have opposed the pipeline, along with a myriad of uranium mining projects proposed for the Paha Sapa, the Black Hills. “All of our tribes have taken action to oppose the Keystone XL pipeline. Members from the seven tribes of the Lakota Nation, along with tribal members and tribes in Idaho, Oklahoma, Montana, Nebraska and Oregon, are prepared to stop construction of the pipeline. “

This past October, the Lakota rode some of the proposed pipeline route in a set of 3 rides organized by grassroots and national organizations, including Honor the Earth, Owe Aku, and 350.org. The routes covered territory between Wanbli on the Pine Ridge reservation to Takini on the Cheyenne River reservation, in a spiritual ride to honor the water and counter the oil. This ride was one of three rides (the other 2 were Minnesota pipeline rides on the Alberta Clipper and proposed Sandpiper route for fracked oil). The Lakota will ride again. That is, if the pipeline project gets President Obama’s approval. That is, if the Nebraska and Iowa lawmakers don’t stop it first because of the little constitutional problems of eminent domain. That is also, if the Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t close it down.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/the-fat-takers-pipeline-native-people-the-kxl-the-cowboy-and-indian-alliance-and-the-constitution-by-winona-laduke/

Tomorrow is the start of a week long action in DC targeting the KXL pipeline and tar sands dubbed “Reject and Protect” culminating in a mass action on April 26th. Can’t make it to DC? Hold a solidarity rally in your hometown. Take a similar stance against environment injustices in your community. The time is now. Our 1st mother awaits.

Tomorrow is the start of a week long action in DC targeting the KXL pipeline and tar sands dubbed “Reject and Protect” culminating in a mass action on April 26th. Can’t make it to DC? Hold a solidarity rally in your hometown. Take a similar stance against environment injustices in your community. The time is now. Our 1st mother awaits.

University of North Dakota and Time-Out Week 2014 by BJ Rainbow

Indian Studies Association’s mission statement says that they are to promote a better understanding of cultures between students, faculty, staff and the greater grand forks region. To encourage communication among student and alumni members, faculty, staff and administration.

To establish a sense of community among all UND Indian studies majors and minors. To help with the recruitment and retention of students into the Indian studies department.

To foster a closer relationship between current Indian studies students and Indian studies alumni. Increase cultural awareness by providing workshops and other events throughout the academic school year.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/university-of-north-dakota-and-time-out-week-2014-by-robert-rainbow/

University of North Dakota and Time-Out Week 2014 by BJ Rainbow

Indian Studies Association’s mission statement says that they are to promote a better understanding of cultures between students, faculty, staff and the greater grand forks region. To encourage communication among student and alumni members, faculty, staff and administration.

To establish a sense of community among all UND Indian studies majors and minors. To help with the recruitment and retention of students into the Indian studies department.

To foster a closer relationship between current Indian studies students and Indian studies alumni. Increase cultural awareness by providing workshops and other events throughout the academic school year.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/university-of-north-dakota-and-time-out-week-2014-by-robert-rainbow/

Sigma Chi and University of North Dakota Indian Association Peacemaking, By Twyla Baker-Demaray

It’s hard to know where to start this story. I guess I’ll just start at the beginning.

My husband and our family have for years been a part of the Grand Forks, ND community of Natives, and we have, along with our relatives there, built a tight knit circle of support. Anyone who has left the rez and gone to live in an urban setting is probably familiar with the loneliness, isolation, and sense of separation you experience once you leave home. We built up in our social circle, a family; a group of people who we relied upon and who relied upon us for support and candor, honesty and realness, whenever we called upon them no matter the time of day or night. We decided early on in our time there that we didn’t want people to have to feel what we felt when we first arrived in Grand Forks, and so we welcomed more and more into our circle. We laughed, prayed, cried, and celebrated together, and continue to do so to this day. In a place as charged with racial tension as Grand Forks, this circle was key to not only our survival there, but our thriving as a society of our own. Eventually we formalized what we were doing, and created a non-profit Native American organization outside of the one found on the UND campus, which we called Northstar Council. We remain closely tied to this community, despite having moved back to Fort Berthold in the summer of ’13, as one doesn’t simply cut ties with those you consider family.

For years my husband and I had been highly active with the UND community and the annual Time-Out Week and Wacipi, held in the spring. Our community knows and prepares all year long for this week of events culminating in the powwow, which is arguably the largest indoor powwow in North Dakota. It is the lead-in to the summer powwow season and anticipated by powwow goers across Indian Country, as it is one of the first major gatherings at the close of our long dark winters, when people come back together to sing, greet friends and relatives, and maybe show off the new regalia they’ve worked on all winter. The week prior to the powwow itself is full of events, speakers, and other gatherings which require their own effort in preparing; I remember thinking each year that by the time people show up for Wacipi, the Time-Out week organizers are already completely exhausted from their work.

Time-Out has not been without its challenges. Each year, unpaid student volunteers must essentially fight for this event, making the case for its value, over and over to a new student government. It has been this way probably since its inception 44 years ago. For those who have been in the Grand Forks community for several years, this proves to be a tired exercise in cultural sensitivity training, which is exceedingly frustrating when the ones you are making your case to have in theory, ‘committed themselves to cultural diversity’.

News broke recently of insensitive acts by certain members of the campus community, which I won’t go into depth with here; my story is more along the lines of what CAN happen, when people are willing to look beyond themselves.

My husband and I had both been invited to speak in different venues by the organizers of Time-Out, and we both gladly accepted, happy at the chance to help. His talk took place a day before mine did. He was to speak about his experience last summer in travelling to South America in a cultural exchange with indigenous people in Brazil (the Xukuru people, to be exact). We saw it as a great opportunity to share stories and spend some time with people we hold great affection for. Our happiness was short lived however, as upon his arrival at the venue, the climate changed and prejudice showed its ugly face.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/sigma-chi-and-university-of-north-dakota-indian-association-peacemaking-by-twyla-baker-demaray/

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issues Uranium Mining Operating License in the Black Hills

On April 8th, 2014, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued an operating license to the Powertech Uranium Corp for its proposed uranium mine in the Black Hills.  The move comes four months ahead of a public hearing scheduled to hear opposing voices to the proposed uranium mine.

The NRC said in a statement that a review “concluded the proposed facility can operate safely, including management of radiological and chemical hazards, groundwater protection, and eventual cleanup and decommissioning.”

The proposed uranium mine still needs final approval from the South Dakota Board of Minerals and Environment, the South Dakota Water Management Board, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency before it can began mining uranium.

Powertech Uranium projects that the 17-square mile mine would yield 1-million pounds of uranium annually for up to 8 years.

The proposed uranium mine is opposed by area Tribes, ranchers, environmentalist and the Rapid City Council.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/u-s-nuclear-regulatory-commission-issues-uranium-mining-operating-liscense-in-the-black-hills/

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issues Uranium Mining Operating License in the Black Hills

On April 8th, 2014, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued an operating license to the Powertech Uranium Corp for its proposed uranium mine in the Black Hills. The move comes four months ahead of a public hearing scheduled to hear opposing voices to the proposed uranium mine.

The NRC said in a statement that a review “concluded the proposed facility can operate safely, including management of radiological and chemical hazards, groundwater protection, and eventual cleanup and decommissioning.”

The proposed uranium mine still needs final approval from the South Dakota Board of Minerals and Environment, the South Dakota Water Management Board, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency before it can began mining uranium.

Powertech Uranium projects that the 17-square mile mine would yield 1-million pounds of uranium annually for up to 8 years.

The proposed uranium mine is opposed by area Tribes, ranchers, environmentalist and the Rapid City Council.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/u-s-nuclear-regulatory-commission-issues-uranium-mining-operating-liscense-in-the-black-hills/

Natives are on that level, athletically and academically. Shoni & Jude Schimmel! Congrats to Shoni on her being drafted by the Atlanta Dream 8th overall in the WNBA Draft tonight. 
 Photo by Holly Rowe @sportsiren

Natives are on that level, athletically and academically. Shoni & Jude Schimmel! Congrats to Shoni on her being drafted by the Atlanta Dream 8th overall in the WNBA Draft tonight.
Photo by Holly Rowe @sportsiren