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555 posts tagged Lakota

Commodification of the Sacred: The Appropriation of the Lakota Headdress, By April E. Lindala

“The commodification of difference promotes paradigms of consumption wherein whatever
different the Other inhabits is eradicated, via exchange, by a consumer cannibalism that not
only displaces the Other but denies the significance of that Other’s history through a process of
decontextualization.” — bell hooks, Black Looks

On a weekly, if not daily basis, I am short-circuited by discriminatory visual markers that comfortably reside within modern society’s culture industry. This could range from the mascot of Washington D.C.’s NFL football team to the advertising blitz for the Johnny Depp film, The Lone Ranger to supermodel and television host, Heidi Klum wearing a replication of a Lakota headdress at a highly publicized karaoke party for the elite. Misrepresenting, commodifying, and thus, marginalizing American Indians within the culture industry is certainly not a new trend (can we say classic westerns?). However, in the past ten years, I’ve noticed more celebrities and public figures donning a reproduction of what appears to be a Lakota headdress in modern (and disrespectful) contexts: a musical concert, fashion shows; and beauty pageants. Wearing imitation headdresses within such postmodern situations erases the political and spiritual significance of an authentic eagle-feather headdress. No doubt the headdress is a striking item to behold; it makes one pause to take notice. Thus, the choice behind misappropriating the headdress one can safely assume is to make a provocative statement visually by wearing it in such contexts.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/commodification-of-the-sacred-the-appropriation-of-the-lakota-headdress-by-april-e-lindala/

Commodification of the Sacred: The Appropriation of the Lakota Headdress, By April E. Lindala

“The commodification of difference promotes paradigms of consumption wherein whatever
different the Other inhabits is eradicated, via exchange, by a consumer cannibalism that not
only displaces the Other but denies the significance of that Other’s history through a process of
decontextualization.” — bell hooks, Black Looks

On a weekly, if not daily basis, I am short-circuited by discriminatory visual markers that comfortably reside within modern society’s culture industry. This could range from the mascot of Washington D.C.’s NFL football team to the advertising blitz for the Johnny Depp film, The Lone Ranger to supermodel and television host, Heidi Klum wearing a replication of a Lakota headdress at a highly publicized karaoke party for the elite. Misrepresenting, commodifying, and thus, marginalizing American Indians within the culture industry is certainly not a new trend (can we say classic westerns?). However, in the past ten years, I’ve noticed more celebrities and public figures donning a reproduction of what appears to be a Lakota headdress in modern (and disrespectful) contexts: a musical concert, fashion shows; and beauty pageants. Wearing imitation headdresses within such postmodern situations erases the political and spiritual significance of an authentic eagle-feather headdress. No doubt the headdress is a striking item to behold; it makes one pause to take notice. Thus, the choice behind misappropriating the headdress one can safely assume is to make a provocative statement visually by wearing it in such contexts.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/commodification-of-the-sacred-the-appropriation-of-the-lakota-headdress-by-april-e-lindala/

OST President Investigating Accusations of Abuse at Reservation School by Joe Flood

Oglala Sioux Tribe President Bryan Brewer will meet with local school officials this week to discuss accusations of inappropriate touching of a student by a school staffer.

The incident allegedly took place earlier this month at Wolf Creek School, a Shannon County District public school located a few miles east of the town of Pine Ridge, on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in southwestern South Dakota. The accused school staffer—a teacher’s aide and non-tribal member who lives off the reservation—allegedly touched the student with his foot, moving it up and down her buttocks, in the hallway of Wolf Creek’s lower elementary school, which educates students through 5th grade.

An incident report was immediately filed with school administration, and school staff members were later told that security camera footage confirmed the physical contact between the teacher’s aide and young student.

School officials and former employees of Wolf Creek School, speaking under condition of anonymity, said that this is not the first time the teacher’s aide in question has been investigated for inappropriate behavior with students.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/ost-president-investigating-accusations-of-abuse-at-reservation-school-by-joe-flood/

THE PEOPLE - a Short Film by Indigenous Filmmakers | Indiegogo

In an effort to build representation for Native American/American Indian creatives and filmmakers, we begin our journey by bringing life to our first short film, produced by our independent production company: INDIGENE ENTERTAINMENT STUDIOS.

in·di·gene (/’indiˌjēn/) noun
“an indigenous person.”

INDIGENE ENTERTAINMENT STUDIOS (or “Indigene Studios”, or just “Indigene”) is an independent creative house production company that we founded on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Our mission is to tell our own stories, rich in our culture and heritage, and to produce and share them with the world. We want to bring our Native voices into the digital era through film, photography, and theatre. As young creative artists, we strive towards being innovative and forward thinking in how we produce our projects and distribute them to the world. We move toward telling unique stories that blend universal themes with our own distinct narratives as indigenous people.

We continue to strive toward changing the negative representations of indigenous peoples (starting with our own people, the Lakota oyate) through a diverse and personal look at contemporary Native people, using engaging and enlightening non-fiction and fictional creative projects. By taking great care, we hope to foster a positive conversation about Native ideals and issues with our audiences.

Our communities on the reservation are an important part of Indigene’s development. We want to get them involved in all projects we produce. Community involvement provides us the opportunity to develop programming that will give educational training and on-set experience. This programming can be used by the young, aspiring artists within the community to aid them in their creative careers. Indigene’s goal is to create a collaborative and thriving local community of creative Native American artists, who are pursuing professions in the industry of film, media and entertainment, with hopes to diversify the industry.

Two more South Dakota Lakota tribes advance toward their own foster care systems, intending to replace the State DSS system

The Lakota people have taken another positive step toward preserving their cultural sovereignty and solving the persistent foster care crisis in the state as two more tribes have joined the movement to apply for available federal funding to plan their own tribal-run foster care system.

“The addition of Flandreau and Lower Brule Sioux Tribes to the growing list of South Dakota-based Lakota tribes applying for federal funding demonstrates that the goal of establishing independent foster care systems is within reach,” said Chase Iron Eyes, attorney for the Lakota People’s Law Project and a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. “The Lakota tribal governments have done their part, it is time for the United States government to meet its obligation to Indian Country. No more broken promises, no more unfulfilled agreements.”

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/two-more-south-dakota-lakota-tribes-advance-toward-their-own-foster-care-systems-intending-to-replace-the-state-dss-system/

Two more South Dakota Lakota tribes advance toward their own foster care systems, intending to replace the State DSS system

The Lakota people have taken another positive step toward preserving their cultural sovereignty and solving the persistent foster care crisis in the state as two more tribes have joined the movement to apply for available federal funding to plan their own tribal-run foster care system.

“The addition of Flandreau and Lower Brule Sioux Tribes to the growing list of South Dakota-based Lakota tribes applying for federal funding demonstrates that the goal of establishing independent foster care systems is within reach,” said Chase Iron Eyes, attorney for the Lakota People’s Law Project and a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. “The Lakota tribal governments have done their part, it is time for the United States government to meet its obligation to Indian Country. No more broken promises, no more unfulfilled agreements.”

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/two-more-south-dakota-lakota-tribes-advance-toward-their-own-foster-care-systems-intending-to-replace-the-state-dss-system/

Last week on the Pine Ridge Rez in Manderson, SD an officer was caught on tape tasering an unarmed, non-violent tribal member 23 times! These abuses of power by the police must cease.