LAST REAL INDIANS

I get numerous letters from credit card companies telling me I’m pre-approved for a credit card with outrageous interest rates and fees. I didn’t want to waste the pre-paid envelope, so here’s what I sent back to them. It reads:
 “Dear Citi Card
 I am not now, nor will I ever be interested in your “subprime” credit card featuring 39.9% (APR) and $60 annual fee. However, I didn’t want to waste your prepaid stamped envelope, so I drew this picture of what I hope will be the future relationship between your company and me. (You’re the one with the gun)
 Sincerely
 Steven Paul Judd

I get numerous letters from credit card companies telling me I’m pre-approved for a credit card with outrageous interest rates and fees. I didn’t want to waste the pre-paid envelope, so here’s what I sent back to them. It reads:
“Dear Citi Card
I am not now, nor will I ever be interested in your “subprime” credit card featuring 39.9% (APR) and $60 annual fee. However, I didn’t want to waste your prepaid stamped envelope, so I drew this picture of what I hope will be the future relationship between your company and me. (You’re the one with the gun)
Sincerely
Steven Paul Judd

Decolonizing Indigenous Communities | Last Real Indians

In Navajo, the individual is known as a nat’aani, a respected leader. In Nez Perce, we called that person a me’yo’xut, someone who lead (male or female) with diplomacy regarding fishing, hunting, gathering, and trading due to their Indigenous knowledge and experience. As Indigenous people we valued an individual’s knowledge, especially when the individual had a record that our People knew about, for example in war deeds, negotiations, and in how an individual cared for their family and community. We did not listen to words, we listened to actions.
At present, regardless of which Tribe we come from, we as Indigenous people believe in the path of our ancestors who lead and valued leadership because it meant a way of life or death. Indigenous children were disciplined early on and taught how to hunt, gather roots and berries, fish, cure and tan hides, and live according to what they were instructed because on any given day an enemy could swoop through and living through harsh conditions necessitated following instructions…

On This Day (3/13/1982): In 1982 the Río Negro massacre took place, where over 177 Maya – including 70 women and 107 children – were killed. At six o’clock in the morning the army entered the community of Río Negro. They went to every house asking for the men, but they were not in their homes because they used to spend the nights in the mountain for security reasons. The army then gathered up the women and children, forcing them to dance, in the words of the soldiers, as they danced with the guerrillas. A number of young women were taken and raped. After, the army forced the people to walk about three miles up the mountain. “Throughout the walk, they beat the women a lot, they called them cows. They beat the children a lot calling them sons of guerrillas”. When they got to the top of Pacoxom Hill the army killed all of the women and children, dumping them in a pit which they covered with stones and branches. The massacre was part of the larger Rio Negro Massacres (1980-1982), which were the result of Maya Achi being forcibly relocated due to the construction of the Chixoy Dam. When hundreds of residents refused to relocate, or returned after finding the conditions of resettlement villages were not what the government had promised, these men, women, and children were kidnapped, raped, and massacred by paramilitary and military officials.

On This Day (3/13/1982): In 1982 the Río Negro massacre took place, where over 177 Maya – including 70 women and 107 children – were killed. At six o’clock in the morning the army entered the community of Río Negro. They went to every house asking for the men, but they were not in their homes because they used to spend the nights in the mountain for security reasons. The army then gathered up the women and children, forcing them to dance, in the words of the soldiers, as they danced with the guerrillas. A number of young women were taken and raped. After, the army forced the people to walk about three miles up the mountain. “Throughout the walk, they beat the women a lot, they called them cows. They beat the children a lot calling them sons of guerrillas”. When they got to the top of Pacoxom Hill the army killed all of the women and children, dumping them in a pit which they covered with stones and branches. The massacre was part of the larger Rio Negro Massacres (1980-1982), which were the result of Maya Achi being forcibly relocated due to the construction of the Chixoy Dam. When hundreds of residents refused to relocate, or returned after finding the conditions of resettlement villages were not what the government had promised, these men, women, and children were kidnapped, raped, and massacred by paramilitary and military officials.

Enbridge Tar Sands to Montreal Pipeline Approved

Last week, while National attention was focused on the final week of the public commenting period to the State Department regarding the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline, Canada quietly approved another Tar Sands pipeline.

Canada’s National Energy Board approved the expansion and reversal of Enbridge’s Line 9 pipeline. “Reversal” means the pipeline will now be able to carry the tar sands crude oil east, rather than just west. “Expansion” means that it will be able to carry the tar sands crude connecting the Alberta Tar Sand’s to Montreal.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/enbridge-tar-sands-to-montreal-pipelne-approved/

Enbridge Tar Sands to Montreal Pipeline Approved

Last week, while National attention was focused on the final week of the public commenting period to the State Department regarding the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline, Canada quietly approved another Tar Sands pipeline.

Canada’s National Energy Board approved the expansion and reversal of Enbridge’s Line 9 pipeline. “Reversal” means the pipeline will now be able to carry the tar sands crude oil east, rather than just west. “Expansion” means that it will be able to carry the tar sands crude connecting the Alberta Tar Sand’s to Montreal.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/enbridge-tar-sands-to-montreal-pipelne-approved/

Indigenous New Media Symposium - Panel Discussion | The New School

BK Nation Call for Submission of Short Videos of Native Women & Girls of All Ages for Women’s History Month

“Today a female will give birth, a female will be raped, a female will laugh, a female will awake. In light of Women’s History Month in March, we are here to honor the female, women and girls on this planet–in all their hardships, triumphs, and successes. The females who hold our hands and who replenish our mental ache. The females who continue to love in spite of it all, and the females who paved the way for equality and for belief in the greatness of woman and of girl power. Please join us throughout this month as we listen and engage with the voices of both males and females, as we analyze what it would be like if women and girls ruled the world.”—The BK Nation Editorial Team

BK Nation (“BK” stands for “Building Knowledge”) is a new national organization based in New York City. It is a movement of people from all backgrounds, combining grassroots activism, pop culture, technology, and social media to spark projects and campaigns led by the people, for the people. BK Nation embraces the motto “The leadership is us” to convey that “any real and lasting change in our America, and on our planet, will happen because of our voices, our ideas, and our actions.”

My brilliant and powerful women friends:

BK Nation, via our website www.bknation.org, is doing a special Women’s History Month package throughout March. We are asking women and girls of all backgrounds and ages to use your cellphone or computer video camera and make a short video no longer than 30-60 seconds. Say your first and last name, where you are from, and then complete this sentence: “If women and girls ruled the world….” Once done please email your video to mia@bknation.org and kevin@kevinpowell.net. Thank you so much!

We would love to get Native sister voices of all ages and humbly request submissions. Please send by March 15th, 2014.

Kevin Powell

BK Nation, President & Cofounder
Website: www.bknation.org
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BKNationPage
Twitter: @kevin_powell
Twitter: @BKNationOrg
“The leadership is us.”

http://lastrealindians.com/bk-nation-call-for-submission-of-short-videos-of-native-women-girls-of-all-ages-for-womens-history-month/

I AM INDIGENOUS by Chad Charlie

I am indigenous.
I am the first people you see when you discover a new land.
I am the squatter who lived here before any of these new plans.
I am the savage who fought for the sake of my family.
I am the beast that you patriotically killed randomly.
I am the disease infested Injin that accepted your sickness filled blankets.
I am the unreligious devil who worshipped my god but represented satan.
I am the drunk laying on the corner, but yet I don’t drink.
I am the university studying lawyer, but yet I don’t think.
I am the worthless orphan left in foster care away from my culture.
Many of my people wanted to adopt me but I was fed to the vultures.
I am the residential school survivor that was stripped of my bogus traditions.
I am the chief of my people but yet, I belong in prison.
I am the mascot of your sports teams, And the names of your cities.
I am the non-existing parasite that you apologize to out of pity.
I am the one who taught you to harvest and to use natures medicine.
But I am also the one who has yet to come up with an invention.
My intentions were to kill you, rape your wives and enslave your children.
Only to assimilate you so you can become regular civilians.
I speak in my language that you recognize as dumb.
I am the crazy person because I don’t speak in tongue.
I am your spirit guide, I am open for prayer. But I am also available when you want to speak to a bear.
I am the old Indian ghost on whose grave you live.
I am the cartoon character that you portray to little kids.
I am your Apache helicopter and your Jeep Grand Cherokee.
And apparently I’m a float in your parade when you feel like staring at me.
I am an Indian giver, I take things back when I like.
I am your ironically cold-blooded indigenous stereotype

http://lastrealindians.com/i-am-indigenous-by-chad-charlie/