LAST REAL INDIANS

For Immediate Release: Indigenous Environmental Network Campaign to STOP GE Trees

Qualla Boundary, North Carolina–In the shadow of Columbus Day and the legacy of colonization in the Americas, the Indigenous Environmental Network [1] and Eastern Band of Cherokee community members organized a gathering of Indigenous Peoples from across the Southeastern US for an historic Indigenous Peoples’ action camp against genetically engineered trees (GE trees). 

Participants condemned GE trees as a form of colonization of the forest.
The Indigenous Environmental Network Campaign to STOP GE Trees Action Camp focused on building an information-sharing and mobilization network of tribal representatives and community members to address the unique threats posed by GE trees to Indigenous Peoples, their culture, traditions and lifeways. Steering Committee members of the Campaign to STOP GE Trees [2] were invited to present concerns about the social and ecological dangers of GE trees.

“All trees and the variety of life that depend on forest biodiversity have historically and will in the future continue to be a necessary part of Indigenous culture and survival, which GE trees directly threaten,” stated BJ McManama, an organizer with the Indigenous Environmental Network.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/for-immediate-release-indigenous-environmental-network-campaign-to-stop-ge-trees/

For Immediate Release: Indigenous Environmental Network Campaign to STOP GE Trees

Qualla Boundary, North Carolina–In the shadow of Columbus Day and the legacy of colonization in the Americas, the Indigenous Environmental Network [1] and Eastern Band of Cherokee community members organized a gathering of Indigenous Peoples from across the Southeastern US for an historic Indigenous Peoples’ action camp against genetically engineered trees (GE trees).

Participants condemned GE trees as a form of colonization of the forest.
The Indigenous Environmental Network Campaign to STOP GE Trees Action Camp focused on building an information-sharing and mobilization network of tribal representatives and community members to address the unique threats posed by GE trees to Indigenous Peoples, their culture, traditions and lifeways. Steering Committee members of the Campaign to STOP GE Trees [2] were invited to present concerns about the social and ecological dangers of GE trees.

“All trees and the variety of life that depend on forest biodiversity have historically and will in the future continue to be a necessary part of Indigenous culture and survival, which GE trees directly threaten,” stated BJ McManama, an organizer with the Indigenous Environmental Network.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/for-immediate-release-indigenous-environmental-network-campaign-to-stop-ge-trees/

lakotapeopleslawproject:

What can you do to ensure that the boarding school era remains in the past? Sign our petition: http://lakotalaw.org/action ! Become a member: http://lakotalaw.org/donate-new .The Lakota people have been suffering a cultural genocide for over 130 years. The taking of the Lakota children used to be under the guise of education in the boarding school era and it now exists through South Dakota’s Department of Social Services. DSS not only removes Lakota children from their families, often under suspicious auspices, but these children are also removed from their communities in direct violation of the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978. We would like to ensure that this never happens again by helping to create a Lakota-run child and family service programs. Everyday we are getting closer to attaining this goal, but we cannot achieve this solution without your help and support. Please sign our petition and donate to become a member!

lakotapeopleslawproject:

What can you do to ensure that the boarding school era remains in the past? Sign our petition: http://lakotalaw.org/action ! Become a member: http://lakotalaw.org/donate-new .

The Lakota people have been suffering a cultural genocide for over 130 years. The taking of the Lakota children used to be under the guise of education in the boarding school era and it now exists through South Dakota’s Department of Social Services. DSS not only removes Lakota children from their families, often under suspicious auspices, but these children are also removed from their communities in direct violation of the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978. We would like to ensure that this never happens again by helping to create a Lakota-run child and family service programs. Everyday we are getting closer to attaining this goal, but we cannot achieve this solution without your help and support. Please sign our petition and donate to become a member!

The Lakota Law Project Report

lakotapeopleslawproject:

Read our most recent blog on the 28th Annual Black Hills Powwow at
lakotalawproject.wordpress.com ! The powwow was celebrated this last weekend in Rapid City, and we were there to join in the spirit of unity to create a dialogue between the tribes that have received their Title IV-E planning grants to help them create Lakota-run foster care programs. Let’s all continue with the spirit of unity to accomplish great things for the Lakota people!

Scenes from Seattle’s 1st #IndigenousPeoplesDay #AbolishColumbusDay #LRI

The Rise of Indigenous Peoples Day by Matt Remle 

On October 6, 2014, in a packed Seattle city hall council chambers room, the Seattle city council voted unanimously to rename the second Monday in October, the federal holiday Columbus Day, to Indigenous Peoples’ Day for the city of Seattle. The room erupted in emotion with loud cheers, the sound of drums and the sight of over joyed, smiling and crying faces followed by an impromptu singing of the AIM song in the halls of Seattle city hall.

The Seattle city council vote followed the previous weeks unanimous vote by the Seattle school board to both establish the second Monday in October as a day of observance for Indigenous Peoples’ and to make a board commitment to the teaching of tribal history, culture, governance and current affairs into the Seattle public schools system.

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/10/13/rise-indigenous-peoples-day

The Rise of Indigenous Peoples Day by Matt Remle

On October 6, 2014, in a packed Seattle city hall council chambers room, the Seattle city council voted unanimously to rename the second Monday in October, the federal holiday Columbus Day, to Indigenous Peoples’ Day for the city of Seattle. The room erupted in emotion with loud cheers, the sound of drums and the sight of over joyed, smiling and crying faces followed by an impromptu singing of the AIM song in the halls of Seattle city hall.

The Seattle city council vote followed the previous weeks unanimous vote by the Seattle school board to both establish the second Monday in October as a day of observance for Indigenous Peoples’ and to make a board commitment to the teaching of tribal history, culture, governance and current affairs into the Seattle public schools system.

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/10/13/rise-indigenous-peoples-day